Connect to Wireless Display dongle

Hello everyone,

today I want to show you a little project I have been working on🙂

The project:

My father was searching for a way to watch videos and pictures on his big TV screen. (To watch YouTube Videos or show family pictures to his friends, etc.) Since his TV is not the newest one and I wanted to keep it as simple as possible for him I came up with this idea:

Use a tablet PC as the core component and a Wireless display dongle to mirror the tablet PCs screen. This way the tablet PC is both: The computer and the remote control.

Here is the hardware I used:

TrekStor SurfTab wintron 7.0 as the tablet PC.

wintron_7
VicTsing 2,4 G HDMI Miracast Dongle as the Wireless display dongle.

victsing_miracast_dongle

How I did it:

As you may know many tablet PCs have a “Windows Key” which, in my opinion, is not very useful in its default state. It opens the Windows Start Menu like every normal Windows Key on a standard keyboard but how often do you need this on a tablet? (It makes more sense on tablet PCs which have a hardware keyboard because you can use keyboard shortcuts but most of the cheap tablet PCs do not have a hardware keyboard.) So I thought: Why not reuse it for an other purpose? So I used AutoHotkey to remap the Windows Key to a custom script I wrote. (I got this idea after reading this post on stackoverflow. The user jaredbaszler published a great AutoHotkey script to connect to a specific Wireless display dongle which inspired me to write my own AutoHotkey script for this project.)

wintron_7_win_key
And here is the script which will connect our tablet PC to our Wireless display dongle: (Please keep in mind that this script will only work as expected if you have only 1 Wireless display dongle up and running. If you have multiple Wireless display dongles please have a look at jaredbaszler´s script here.)

LWin::
Send #k ; Sends Windows button + K to open the Action Center Connect window
Sleep, 3000 ; Wait some time so the wireless display dongle can be found
Send {Enter} ; Send ENTER key to connect to wireless display dongle (works when only 1 is found)
Send {Esc} ; Send ESC key to close the Action Center Connect window
Return

This is what the script does:

Every time the user touches the Windows Key it will do the following:

  1. First it will press WIN+K which will open the Action Center Connect window
  2. Then it will wait for 3 seconds so that the wireless display dongle can be found (You can adjust this value as you please but I needed to wait more than 2 seconds for my wireless display dongle to show up)
  3. After the wait it will press ENTER which will automatically choose the first wireless display dongle in the list and trigger the connect function (If no wireless display dongles can be found your Default Browser will open the “Help” link)
  4. The last thing the script does is to press the ESC key to close the Action Center

Please keep in mind that this will always result in connecting to the Wireless display dongle which shows up first in the Connect window. If you are already connected to a Wireless display dongle touching the Windows Key again will result in a disconnect. (I copied the explanation from my answer from stackoverflow to save some time.)

Automate the script:

The last thing we need to do is to run the script every time the user logs on. I did it by configuring a new Task in the Task Scheduler.

wintron_7_task_0
Choose a name for your Task.

wintron_7_task_1
Now choose a Trigger. (I chose to run the Task at user log on.)

wintron_7_task_2

Now simply choose the ActionStart a program” and set the path to your script.

wintron_7_task_3

Next have a look at the Conditions. You will want to uncheckStart the task only if the computer is on AC power.“. Most of the time your tablet PC will not be connected to your power supply when you use it.

wintron_7_task_4

The Settings tab will allow you to define the behavior of your Task.

wintron_7_task_5

Click on OK and you are ready to go.

Tip: If you do not want to install AutoHotkey on your tablet PC you can convert your scripts to executable files by following this guide here.

Well, that´s it. I hope you liked my post and I hope to see you next time🙂

Sources:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/35601005/autoconnect-to-ms-wireless-display-on-windows-10

https://autohotkey.com/docs/commands/Send.htm

http://www.computerhope.com/tips/tip209.htm

 

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Raspberry Pi – Tontec 3.5″ Screen Installation

Hello everyone,

today I want to show you how I set up my Tontec 3.5″ Screen on my Raspberry Pi B. I thought I should write about this in my blog since it took quite some research to get this screen up and running. Ok. Let´s start🙂

Used Hardware:

  • Raspberry Pi B
  • Tontec 3.5″ Screen (I bought it from here.)

Used Software:

  • Raspbian Wheezy (You can download it from here.)

The first step is simple. Build the case and attach the screen to your Raspberry Pi. When you are done it should look like this:

tontec_raspberry_pi_screen
Now we will update the Raspbian Wheezy Operating System:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
sudo reboot

Now we will download and install a firmware update. To do this simply run the following commands and wait a few minutes:

sudo apt-get install rpi-update
REPO_URI=https://github.com/notro/rpi-firmware
sudo rpi-update
sudo reboot

The next step is to adjust the SPI and Overlay settings to our Tontec MZ61581 display:

sudo nano /boot/config.txt

Add the following code to the end of the file and hit save:

dtparam=spi=on
dtoverlay=mz61581
gpu_mem=128

Your config.txt file should now look like this:

# uncomment if you get no picture on HDMI for a default "safe" mode
#hdmi_safe=1

# uncomment this if your display has a black border of unused pixels visible
# and your display can output without overscan
#disable_overscan=1

# uncomment the following to adjust overscan. Use positive numbers if console
# goes off screen, and negative if there is too much border
#overscan_left=16
#overscan_right=16
#overscan_top=16
#overscan_bottom=16

# uncomment to force a console size. By default it will be display's size minus
# overscan.
#framebuffer_width=1280
#framebuffer_height=720

# uncomment if hdmi display is not detected and composite is being output
#hdmi_force_hotplug=1

# uncomment to force a specific HDMI mode (this will force VGA)
#hdmi_group=1
#hdmi_mode=1

# uncomment to force a HDMI mode rather than DVI. This can make audio work in
# DMT (computer monitor) modes
#hdmi_drive=2

# uncomment to increase signal to HDMI, if you have interference, blanking, or
# no display
#config_hdmi_boost=4

# uncomment for composite PAL
#sdtv_mode=2

#uncomment to overclock the arm. 700 MHz is the default.
#arm_freq=800

# for more options see http://elinux.org/RPi_config.txt
dtparam=spi=on
dtoverlay=mz61581
gpu_mem=128

Now we will install the necessary dependencies to set our Default Display to our Tontec Screen:

sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-video-fbturbo

After you have successfully installed the dependencies you need to alter the following file:

sudo nano /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/99-fbturbo.conf

All you need to do is to alter the following line:

Option "fbdev" "/dev/fb0"

To look like this:

Option "fbdev" "/dev/fb1"

This will switch the Default Display from HDMI to the Tontec Screen.

Here you can see how your 99-fbturbo.conf file should look like:

# This is a minimal sample config file, which can be copied to
# /etc/X11/xorg.conf in order to make the Xorg server pick up
# and load xf86-video-fbturbo driver installed in the system.
#
# When troubleshooting, check /var/log/Xorg.0.log for the debugging
# output and error messages.
#
# Run "man fbturbo" to get additional information about the extra
# configuration options for tuning the driver.

Section "Device"
Identifier "Allwinner A10/A13 FBDEV"
Driver "fbturbo"
Option "fbdev" "/dev/fb1"

Option "SwapbuffersWait" "true"
EndSection

The last step is to tell your Raspberry Pi to display the boot screen on your Tontec Screen. To do so edit the following file:

sudo nano /boot/cmdline.txt

Now add the below code before “rootwait“:

fbcon=map:10

Your cmdline.txt file should now look like this:

dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=ttyAMA0,115200 kgdboc=ttyAMA0,115200 console=tty1 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline fbcon=map:10 rootwait

Now reboot your Raspberry Pi one last time:

sudo reboot

Now when your Raspberry Pi boots your screen should switch on and you should be able to see the boot screen on it.

tontec_raspberry_pi_screen_working

Well, that´s it. Your Tontec screen is now ready to use🙂

If you want to have a look at my config files or the documentation of the screen I found online you can find them here.

I hope you liked my post and I hope to see you again next time🙂

Sources:

https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=63&t=45746&start=75

http://www.riess-group.de/2015/08/29/raspberry-pi-mit-35-zoll-touchscreen-auf-raspbian/ (german)

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Windows 10 – Create new Local User Account

Hello everyone,

welcome to my first post of the year 2016. I hope you had a happy Christmas and a happy new years eve🙂

Today I´m going to show you how you can simply create a new local user account in Windows 10 if you need one. You may ask yourself why I am writing a post about something as simple as that but let me tell you: Microsoft changed the way to create local users in Windows 10 and therefore this task is not as simple as it was in Windows 7 anymore.

Posts like this one from How-To Geek explain pretty good how creating users works now in Windows 10. In my opinion this is too much hassle for a simple requirement like this. Please Microsoft implement something like a simple “Add Button” for local user accounts.

Ok. Although the process of creating a new local user account got more difficult on the GUI than it used to be you will be happy to hear that it still takes only seconds on the command line. Here is what you need to do to create a new local user:

Run cmd as Administrator.

net user <Username> <Password> /add

Well, that´s it. You have successfully created a new local user account🙂

Deleting a user account is just as simple:

net user <Username> /del

As you can see the good old command line is always there to help🙂

I hope my post was useful for you and I hope to see you again next time🙂

Sources:

http://www.howtogeek.com/226540/how-to-create-a-new-local-user-account-in-windows-10/

http://www.groovypost.com/howto/create-local-account-windows-10/

http://thejackol.com/2004/08/03/create-a-local-windows-user-account-cnet/

http://www.wikihow.com/Add-and-Delete-Users-Accounts-With-Command-Prompt-in-Windows

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Raspberry Pi – Send Mails

Hello everyone, today I want to show you how to setup your Raspberry Pi to send mails via Googles SMTP server (smtp.gmail.com). I struggled a bit with Googles security settings and wanted to let you know how to solve the problems I encountered easily.

Before we begin you should update your Raspberry Pi:

sudo apt-get update

Next install ssmtp and mailutils:

sudo apt-get install ssmtp
sudo apt-get install mailutils

Next we will save the current default ssmtp.conf Configuration file:

sudo mv /etc/ssmtp/ssmtp.conf /etc/ssmtp/ssmtp.conf.old

Now we will create a new ssmtp.conf Configuration file:

sudo nano /etc/ssmtp/ssmtp.conf

Now have a look at the Configuration below and replace username and password with your Account data:

root=username@gmail.com
mailhub=smtp.gmail.com:465
rewriteDomain=gmail.com
AuthUser=username@gmail.com
AuthPass=password
FromLineOverride=YES
UseTLS=YES

Important: If your password contains the character # your Configuration will not work since the character # is used to define comments in the Configuration file. (Source: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1691878)

Now run the below command to send a mail via ssmtp:

ssmtp <RecipientMailAddress>
Subject: <YourSubject>
<YourMailText>

or you can use the below command to send a mail via mailutils:

echo "<YourMailText>" | mail -s "<YourSubject>" <RecipientMailAddress>

When you run the above ssmtp command to send your mail you will probably receive an error message like shown in the below screenshot:

send_mail_raspberry_authentication_failed

The error “ssmtp: Authorization failed (534 5.7.14 …” means that the security settings of your Google Mail Account do not allow ssmtp to send mails.

To solve this problem you need to alter the security settings of your Google Mail Account by turning on the “Access for less secure apps” setting.

You can find this setting here: https://www.google.com/settings/security/lesssecureapps

The settings page should now look like this:

send_mail_raspberry_access_less_secure_apps

Now try again to send a mail and it should work now without problems.
Well, that´s it. You should now be able to send mails from your Raspberry Pi.

I hope you liked my post and I hope to see you again next time🙂

Sources:

http://www.raspberry-projects.com/pi/software_utilities/email/ssmtp-to-send-emails

http://ozzmaker.com/2012/12/03/send-email-from-the-raspberry-pi-or-linux-command-line-with-attachments/

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1691878

https://support.google.com/accounts/answer/6010255?hl=en

https://www.google.com/settings/security/lesssecureapps

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Nagios – Improve User Experience with SSI and Javascript

Hello everyone, today I want to show you a little improvement I found for this previous post. (Btw This post has the same prerequisites. So have a look at my posts Nagios – Use UTC and Nagios – Change date format too.) The problem with my previous solution was that you needed either Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox with the Tampermonkey/Greasemonkey plugin to make it work. (And it would not work in Internet Explorer) And you needed to do this for every user who wanted this solution.

Ok. So here is the new solution. We will edit the Nagios web interface so that it will show date and time values in relative time on all browsers for all users.

Ok. Let´s get down to business🙂 (Btw I did this on Ubuntu 14.04.2)

Prerequisites:

You need to download the following scripts first to make my RelativeTime.js Script work:

Now create a new folder in “/usr/local/nagios/share/js” to store your custom Javascript files: (I called mine custom)

sudo mkdir /usr/local/nagios/share/js/custom

Place moment.js and wgxpath.install.js into your “custom” folder.

And add the following script to your “custom” folder:

<code>function ConvertToRelativeTime()
{
wgxpath.install();
textNodes = document.evaluate("//text()", document, null, XPathResult.UNORDERED_NODE_SNAPSHOT_TYPE, null);

var regexString = /^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2} \d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}$/;
var searchRE = new RegExp(regexString);

for(var i=0;i<textNodes.snapshotLength;i++)
{
var node = textNodes.snapshotItem(i);
node.data = node.data.replace(searchRE, moment.utc(node.data).fromNow());
}
}

document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function(event){
ConvertToRelativeTime();
});
</code>

(Remove the

<code>

and

</code>

tag.)

The script will look for UTC ISO8601 date time values and will replace them with relative date time values. Ok. Now go to “/usr/local/nagios/share/ssi” and create a new file called “common-header.ssi“. (If you create a file called “common-header.ssi” or “common-footer.ssi” it will add a header or footer to all cgi files. If for example you create a file called “status-header.ssi” it will add a header to the status.cgi file. Example here: http://nagios.fm4dd.com/pnp4nagios/docs/view/en_US/webfe)

<code><script type="text/javascript" src="/nagios/js/custom/moment.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="/nagios/js/custom/wgxpath.install.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="/nagios/js/custom/RelativeTime.js"></script>
</code>

(Remove the

<code>

and

</code>

tag.)

Now run the following commands to restart the Apache webserver and the Nagios service to apply the changes:

sudo service apache2 restart
sudo service nagios restart

Here is a picture how your web interface will look before you apply the script:

nagios_before_ssi

Here is a picture how your web interface will look after you applied the script:

nagios_after_ssi

And here is a picture after you applied the script in Internet Explorer:

nagios_after_ssi_internet_explorer

Here is some important information how I made my script work in Internet Explorer:

Important:

If you are using Internet Explorer please keep in mind that “XPathResult” will not work without solutions like “Wicked Good XPath“. And make sure that you are not using Internet Explorers Compatibility Mode otherwise the “DOMContentLoaded” function I use in my RelativeTime.js script will not work.

xpathresult_undefined_internet_explorer

internet_explorer_compatibility_mode

Well, that´s it. Now Nagios should display all date time values in relative time. I hope you liked my post and I hope to see you again next time🙂

As always you can download my code from here.

Sources:

http://nagiosbook.org/html/ch13s02.html

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/799981/document-ready-equivalent-without-jquery

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/23560438/xpathresult-is-undefined-in-ie11

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15743049/xpath-incompatible-with-internet-explorer

https://github.com/google/wicked-good-xpath

http://google-opensource.blogspot.co.at/2012/09/wicked-good-xpath-faster-javascript.html

http://iswwwup.com/t/393167235ec7/javascript-wicked-good-xpath-evaluate-xpathresult-contains.html

http://nagios.fm4dd.com/pnp4nagios/docs/view/en_US/webfe

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Export and Import WLAN Profiles

Hello everyone, today I want to show you how you can transfer your WLAN Profile data to another computer. Here is the story behind this post: A few days ago my brother bought a new laptop and asked my if I know a comfortable way to teach his new laptop all necessary information it needed to automatically connect to his WLAN networks like his old laptop did since he did not want to connect to all needed WLAN networks again and enter all the passwords again. So, he basically asked me to configure his new laptop so that it would automatically connect to his WLAN networks at home, at his friends or at work like his old one did. Well, thanks to Google and some great posts mentioned in the Sources below I was able to do this and I will show you how you can do it.

Ok. Let´s begin🙂

The first thing you need to do is to run cmd as Administrator.

Next run the following command to get a list of all WLAN network profiles saved on your computer:

netsh wlan show profiles

Next run the following command to export a specific WLAN network profile:

netsh wlan export profile "YourSSID" key=clear folder="C:\Users\You\Desktop"

The above command will create an XML file like this:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<WLANProfile xmlns="http://www.microsoft.com/networking/WLAN/profile/v1">
<name>YourSSID</name>
<SSIDConfig>
<SSID>
<hex>596f757253534944</hex>
<name>YourSSID</name>
</SSID>
<nonBroadcast>false</nonBroadcast>
</SSIDConfig>
<connectionType>ESS</connectionType>
<connectionMode>auto</connectionMode>
<MSM>
<security>
<authEncryption>
<authentication>WPA2PSK</authentication>
<encryption>AES</encryption>
<useOneX>false</useOneX>
</authEncryption>
<sharedKey>
<keyType>passPhrase</keyType>
<protected>false</protected>
<keyMaterial>YourPassword</keyMaterial>
</sharedKey>
</security>
</MSM>
</WLANProfile>

Now transfer the above file to the computer (I´ll call it computer B) where you want to import the WLAN profile data.

Now run cmd as Administrator on computer B.

To import the WLAN profile run the following command: (The command will import the data for all users. If you want only your current user to get the data replace “user=all” with “user=current”)

netsh wlan add profile filename="C:\Users\You\Desktop\Wi-Fi-YourSSID.xml" user=all

Well, that´s it. Computer B has now all the necessary information about the WLAN network to connect to it.

I hope you liked my today´s post and I hope to see you again next time🙂

Sources:

http://www.7tutorials.com/how-delete-forget-wireless-network-profiles-windows-81

http://winaero.com/blog/how-to-backup-your-wireless-network-profiles-in-windows-8-1-and-windows-8/

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Nagios – Improve User Experience with Tampermonkey/Greasemonkey

Hello everyone, in these last few posts: Nagios – Change date format and Nagios – Use UTC I showed you how you can alter the date format and timezone of your Nagios server. Today I want to show you how you can improve User Experience with a simple Greasemonkey/Tampermonkey script by converting all date time values into relative time values (as seen on Facebook or used by SharePoint).

Important: If you want to use the below script without altering the “regexString” value you will need to follow this post of mine to make Nagios use the ISO8601 date format. And you need to follow this post to make Nagios use UTC.

Ok. Let´s get down to business🙂

If you use Firefox install the Greasemonkey plugin or if you use Google Chrome install the Tampermonkey plugin to run the below script (If you use Internet Explorer you are unfortunately out of luck because neither Greasemonkey nor Tampermonkey are available for it to my knowledge). And here is the script:


// ==UserScript==
// @name Nagios - Date time to relative time
// @namespace https://theezitguy.wordpress.com/
// @version 1.0
// @description This script will turn every date time value into a relative time value (e.g. it will turn "2014-07-21 00:00:00" into "a year ago").
// @author theezitguy
// @match http://10.0.0.3/nagios/*
// @grant none
// @require http://momentjs.com/downloads/moment.js
// ==/UserScript==

//Get all textNodes of the website
textNodes = document.evaluate("//text()", document, null, XPathResult.UNORDERED_NODE_SNAPSHOT_TYPE, null);

//Regex String - Search for date time values in ISO8601 format
var regexString = /^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2} \d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}$/;
var searchRE = new RegExp(regexString);

//Go through all textNodes and replace date time values with relative time values
for (var i=0;i<textNodes.snapshotLength;i++)
{
var node = textNodes.snapshotItem(i);
node.data = node.data.replace(searchRE, moment.utc(node.data).fromNow());
}

The script will do the following:

It will go through every text node on the website and replace all date time values with relative time values.

Important: You need to alter the “@match” value to point to your Nagios server website before you can use it.

Here is a screenshot before I applied my script:

nagios_without_script_utc_time

And here is a screenshot after I applied my script:

nagios_with_script_relative_time

Well, that´s it. You can now easier read your data on your Nagios web interface.

Not bad, right? I hope you liked my today´s post and I hope to see you again next time🙂

Sources:

http://momentjs.com/

http://forum.imerx.net/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=262&start=15

http://tuxradar.com/content/greasemonkey-beginners

http://www.digitoffee.com/programming/get-local-time-utc-using-moment-js/94/

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Nagios – Use UTC

Hello everyone, today I want to show you how you can configure your Nagios server to use UTC time format. This is useful to prevent confusion if you have people from multiple time zones looking at your web interface and it makes reports from your web interface much more useful since you do not need to convert times to UTC first. Ok, let´s do this🙂 (I did this on Ubuntu 14.04.2 – Btw the server was configured to use CEST as default time zone)

First we will open the nagios.cfg file by running the following command:

sudo nano /usr/local/nagios/etc/nagios.cfg

Now search for “use_timezone” and add the following line of code:

use_timezone=UTC

To configure the Nagios web interface to use UTC too we will need to do the following to:

First open the nagios.conf file by running the following command:

sudo nano /etc/apache2/sites-available/nagios.conf

And add this line of code to the “/usr/local/nagios/sbin” section:

SetEnv TZ "UTC"

Your nagios.conf file should now look like this:


# SAMPLE CONFIG SNIPPETS FOR APACHE WEB SERVER
#
# This file contains examples of entries that need
# to be incorporated into your Apache web server
# configuration file. Customize the paths, etc. as
# needed to fit your system.

ScriptAlias /nagios/cgi-bin "/usr/local/nagios/sbin"

<Directory "/usr/local/nagios/sbin">
# SSLRequireSSL
Options ExecCGI
AllowOverride None
Order allow,deny
Allow from all
# Order deny,allow
# Deny from all
# Allow from 127.0.0.1
AuthName "Nagios Access"
AuthType Basic
AuthUserFile /usr/local/nagios/etc/htpasswd.users
Require valid-user
SetEnv TZ "UTC"
</Directory>

Alias /nagios "/usr/local/nagios/share"

<Directory "/usr/local/nagios/share">
# SSLRequireSSL
Options None
AllowOverride None
Order allow,deny
Allow from all
# Order deny,allow
# Deny from all
# Allow from 127.0.0.1
AuthName "Nagios Access"
AuthType Basic
AuthUserFile /usr/local/nagios/etc/htpasswd.users
Require valid-user
</Directory>

Now you need to restart the Nagios and Apache services to apply the changes.

Run the following command to restart Nagios:

sudo service nagios restart

And run this command to restart Apache:

sudo service apache2 restart

And that´s it.

Here is a screenshot before we applied our changes:

nagios_web_interface_before_utc

And here is a screenshot after we applied our changes:

nagios_web_interface_utc

Well, that´s it. Now your Nagios server will use UTC.

I hope you liked my today´s post and I hope to see you again next time🙂

Sources:

http://scratching.psybermonkey.net/2011/04/nagios-time-within-nagios-is-incorrect.html

https://ihazem.wordpress.com/2012/03/14/changing-timezone-on-nagios-core-web-interface/

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Nagios – Change date format

Hello everyone, today a customer asked me to change the default date format for the Nagios web interface since he wanted an international date format instead of the default us date format. I thought I should share the procedure so here is how to do it (I did this on Ubuntu 14.04.2):

This is how the web interface looked before:

nagios_date_format_default

Ok. First open the nagios.cfg file by running the following command:

sudo nano /usr/local/nagios/etc/nagios.cfg

nagios_change_date_format

Next search for “date_format” and change it from:

date_format=us

to:

date_format=iso8601

Save and then restart the Nagios service by running:

sudo service nagios restart

After the Nagios service has successfully restarted your web interface will look like this:

nagios_date_format_iso8601

Well, that´s it. Now all dates will be displayed in the international ISO8601 date format on your Nagios web interface. (Btw this does not change the log file format.)

I hope you liked my today´s post and I hope to see you again next time🙂

Sources:

http://forums.meulie.net/t/nagios-log-format/2978

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Laptop Monitor to external Monitor

Hello everyone, today I want to show you how you can turn an old Laptop monitor to an external monitor so you are able to use your monitor even though your Laptop passed away a long time ago.

Before we begin here is short story why I am writing this post: Some years ago the first Laptop I bought with the first money I earned on my own (a Dell XPS M1530 to be precise) passed away due to heat problems. All attempts to repair it failed so I decided to buy a new Laptop. Since I did not want to throw my old one away I put it into a box which I kept in my basement. Some weeks ago I was searching for something and found the box I put my old Laptop in and I decided to at least revive a part of my old friend.

Here is a picture of the Dell XPS M1530: (Unfortunately I do not have a pre-broken picture of mine)

DellXPSM1530

Ok. Let´s get down to business🙂

Here is what you will need:

  • An old Laptop monitor
  • The correct controller board (e.g. this one here is the correct one for my monitor)
  • A 12V power adapter which can provide at least 4A

The first thing you need to do is to separate your Monitor from your Laptop. (You need to open up your Laptop entirely and to unplug all or at least most of the cables to do so)

laptop_monitor

Now remove the case of your monitor. (This is a bit difficult and you will most likely need to break the case at least partially.)

laptop_monitor_no_case

Now have a look on the backside of your monitor. You should see a serial number like the one shown in the below picture:

laptop_monitor_serial_number

The serial number is important because you will need to search for the right controller board before you can continue.

I found this one here on ebay. (The delivery will take some weeks so be patient)

laptop_monitor_controller_board

When you have the correct controller board we can continue.

Maybe you will notice a cable like the one shown below on your monitor. (Not all monitors do have this cable hanging around separately but quite many do have them) This cable is responsible for the background lighting of the monitor so be careful not to damage it or otherwise your monitor will stay black.

laptop_monitor_backlight_cable

There should be a port on your controller board where you can plug this cable in.

laptop_monitor_backlight_cable_plugged

Now plug in the power adapter and choose a video source to test your monitor.

laptop_monitor_finished

Your monitor should now turn on and display something. (Maybe you need to choose the video source you want to use in the Menu Settings of the controller board before you can see something.)

Well, that´s it. These are the basic steps you need to know if you want to turn your Laptop monitor into an external monitor.

If you want to build a neat little extra monitor for your laptop or computer here is a good Instructable on how to do this.

I hope you liked my today´s post and I hope to see you again next time🙂

Sources:

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Convert-a-Laptop-LCD-into-an-External-Monit/

http://www.ebay.at/itm/111334125694?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

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